Archive for November 2015

What You Missed at Pizza My Mind

Happy Friday Captains, I hope that everyone had a great week! Can you believe that we’re only 4 days away from Thanksgiving break? This semester is quickly coming to an end and that means that the Pizza My Mind events are also dwindling down. We’ve only got one more left, so make sure to come out next Thursday!

Yesterday’s PMM was presented by Newport News Shipbuilding which designs, builds, and maintains nuclear and non-nuclear ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and provides after-market services for military ships around the globe. 115 CNU students came out to hear what Parnetha Callahan, Strategic Recruiter for NNS, had to say about the company. She started off the presentation by mentioning the full time jobs, level 1 jobs, and the internship program opportunities available.

She spoke about the full time and co-op opportunities, but the section of the presentation that received the most notice was the internship program! She mentioned that the company mostly takes Sophomores and Juniors but that they also take Seniors if they are going to Grad School. Students that enter the program should be prepared to commit at least 10 weeks of their summer vacation. It’s important to remember that when submitting your application, a minimum of a 3.0 GPA is required, along with attaching your transcript and resume.

ward

Another great highlight of the presentation was when she asked Professor Steven Ward to speak about his experience with NNS. Professor Ward has been an Adjunct Professor at CNU for a little over two years now! The first thing that he mentioned was that he has been with the company for 18 years and counting. He started off as a sailor in the United States Navy as a Nuclear Machinist Mate. After 8 years in this position, he began working for NNS. He started out as a Senior Engineering Analyst, and then moved onto being a Senior Operations Coordinator. After that he went from Test Engineering to Engineering, and now he is currently a Manager in the Secure Engineering Systems department. The reason for all that was to show how one person can grow within the company and that there is a job for everyone! He mentioned that part of what makes working there so great is that the shipyard is a city in itself. It has it’s own Fire Station, Police Station, Hospital, and Emergency Control Center. He mentioned that there are 1,100 CNU graduates currently working at the shipyard and that a number of those students are in management positions! He explained that if a person were to name a specific degree program here at CNU, that he could name its corresponding position at the shipyard. A tip that he mentioned for students that are interested in applying for positions is to check the site for potential jobs twice a week. The reason for this is that because the shipyard is constantly looking for people to fulfill all sorts of positions, jobs are only posted for five days. So, in order not to miss any positions, make sure to check twice a week!

Well that’s all for now Captains, hope everyone has an amazing weekend!!!

Meet Your Computer Science and Computer Engineering Tutors!

Steven Rosenahl Major: Computer Science and Math Year: Junior Why This Field?: "Computer Science because I really enjoy programming and Math because it constantly works my mind!"

Steven Rosendahl
Major: Computer Science and Math
Year: Junior
Why This Field?: “Computer Science because I really enjoy programming and Math because it constantly works my mind!”

Tim (last name?) Major: Computer Science Year: Senior Why This Field?: "I've been working with computers and technology since I was young. It made sense for me to go into this field, the job security doesn't hurt either!"

Timothy Giles
Major: Computer Science
Year: Senior
Why This Field?: “I’ve been working with computers and technology since I was young. It made sense for me to go into this field, the job security doesn’t hurt either!”

Dustin Smith Major: Computer Science and Computer Engineering Year: Senior Why This Field?: "I've liked computers for as long as I can remember, it's practically all I know!"

Dustin Smith
Major: Computer Science and Computer Engineering
Year: Senior
Why This Field?: “I’ve liked computers for as long as I can remember, it’s practically all I know!”

ACM Programming Competition

acmHappy Friday everyone! Today’s blog post will be all about last Saturday’s ACM ICPC. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, then make sure to keep reading! I had the opportunity to talk to Professor Roberto Flores, who is the Site Director, Nigel Armstrong, member of Team Gamma, and Isaac Sutor, a volunteer. Check out what they had to say!

What is ACM?

The Association for Computer Machinery (ACM) is recognized worldwide as the first membership organization for computing professionals. If you weren’t already aware, CNU has it’s own ACM student chapter!

What is the ICPC?

The ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious programming contest in the world. It’s a network of universities all over the globe that host regional competitions that advance teams to the World Finals. All participating universities within a region compete the exact same day. CNU is part of the mid Atlantic region and within this region, there were 185 teams of three from 68 universities this year. There are only nine sites that host the regional competition and CNU happens to be one of those sites! This year’s regional competition was held last Saturday at CNU’s very own Hunter Creech lab. Our department hosted 16 teams from the College of William and Mary, Richmond University, the University of Mary Washington and Virginia Wesleyan College.

What does the competition consist of?

All nine sites are very well coordinated since all the teams in the region must start and end at the exact same time. That means that on November 7th, 185 teams were attempting to solve the seven programming problems presented by the ACM from noon to five pm. There was one computer provided to each team and the teams could only use printed material as reference to help them solve these problems. Once a team solves a problem, the solution is sent to an online judge. This judge immediately sends a response if the solution submitted was right or wrong. Once a team successfully answers a problem, a balloon is posted at their station. There is a different colored balloon for every problem, which allows other teams to see how far their competitors are.

acm

Who’s responsible for CNU’s site?

rob

Site Director: Roberto A. Flores (pictured in the blue shirt)
Alternative Judge: Keith Perkins (pictured in the red shirt)
System Administrator: Raymond Koehl (pictured in the green shirt)

Also pictured: Department Chair, Anton Riedl, coaches from other universities and the coach for CNU’s teams, Aaron Koehl.

CNU’s Team Gamma:

There were three CNU teams: team Alpha, team Beta and team Gamma. Out of the 16 teams that competed at Hunter Creech, team Gamma placed 4th! David Baker, Dan Ackerman and Nigel Armstrong were the three CNU students in team Gamma, pictured below:

nigelll

I had the opportunity to talk to Nigel Armstrong about his experience with the ACM ICPC.

“I am a senior, but it’s only my third year at CNU. I’m majoring in Computer Engineering because I enjoy programming and building electronics, and this major falls right in the middle. This is my second year competing in the ACM ICPC for CNU. This year’s experience was amazing. It was a great way to apply the abstract concepts learned in class to challenging problems. Team Gamma had some basic strategies going in, some things we learned from past competitions. One important strategy we planned going in was to divide and conquer. One person immediately began coding the easiest problem, while someone else went off to devise a solution to a more difficult problem. This certainly allowed us to make the best use of the limited time given in the competition. Also, as a team, we planned who was best with what topics, and planned on assigning problems based on expertise in the competition. This year, the best time I had was in the last few minutes of the competition. We had correctly gotten two problems already and we were tantalizingly close on our third solution. With less than two minutes left in the competition we submitted four different solutions to the problem, hoping one would be correct. We never got an answer back from the judging server, but someone came and told us we had three points on the scoreboard. One of those last four submissions was the correct answer.”
CNU’s Volunteers:
vol
There were 10 volunteers at this year’s competition. They were all CNU students who helped out with the logistics of the competition. They helped with getting everyone’s registration, handing out prizes, set up and clean up. I also had the chance to interview a volunteer. Isaac Sutor is a freshman majoring in Computer Science, pictured on the right.
vol2
“After hearing about the ACM ICPC, I first considered trying to join one of teams. However, I felt that I wouldn’t have enough time to fully commit to the competition. I was still really intrigued by it and still wanted to be a part of it somehow, so I decided to volunteer! After seeing how everything works, it’s definitely something that I would be interested in for next year. I found it awesome how all across the nation different teams were taking part in the competition. It was sort of a test of how the school stands against other universities in the nation. My favorite part of the day was seeing the balloons go up. It was interesting to see how quickly some teams got balloons compared to those that didn’t have any and how all of a sudden, those teams would get several at once. In addition, I also really enjoyed being able to meet new people from other departments in different universities. I got to talking to a few of the guys about how their department works and how it differs from ours.”

Meet Your Physics Tutors!

Mathew Major: Physics Year: Junior Why Physics?: ""Physics because all my teachers in high school said it would be waste of potential if I wasn't a physics or math major, and because I love it!"

Mathew Jackson
Major: Physics
Year: Junior
Why This Field?: “Physics because all my teachers in high school said it would be waste of potential if I wasn’t a physics or math major, and because I love it!”

Katie Krohmaly Major: Physics Year: Junior Why Physics?: "Physics because I really like math and physics is just applied mathematics. Also, because physics is phun!"

Katie Krohmaly
Major: Physics
Year: Junior
Why This Field?: “Physics because I really like math and physics is just applied mathematics. Also, because physics is phun!”

Maximilian Castelli Major: Computational Applied Math with a concentration in Physics Dynamics and Engineering Year: Junior Why?: "I love the concepts that come along with Physics and the certainty in Mathematics. Computer Science has always interested me and I enjoy all the courses I get to take with the concentration. Engineering allows me to work with more tangible things, with this major I get it all!"

Maximilian Castelli
Major: Computational Applied Math with a concentration in Physics Dynamics and Engineering
Year: Junior
Why?: “I love the concepts that come along with Physics and the certainty in Mathematics. Computer Science has always interested me and I enjoy all the courses I get to take with the concentration. Engineering allows me to work with more tangible things, with this major I get it all!”